New American Standard Bible

Back to Reader

1 Kings

4

:

13

Ben-geber, in Ramoth-gilead (the towns of Jair, the son of Manasseh, which are in Gilead were his: the region of Argob, which is in Bashan, sixty great cities with walls and bronze bars were his);

Lexicon

Verse part Definition: Part of speech: Strong's: Hebrew: Transliteration:
Ben-geber, "son of a man," one of Solomon's leaders H1127 גֶּ֖בֶר ge·ver
Analysis:
Read more about: Ben-geber, Geber
in Ramoth-gilead a city E. of the Jordan H7433 בְּרָמֹ֣ת be·ra·mot
Analysis:
Read more about: Ramoth-gilead
(the towns a tent village H2333 חַוֹּת֩ chav·vot
of Jair, "he enlightens," three Isr. H2971 יָאִ֨יר ya·'ir
Analysis:
Read more about: Jair
the son son H1121 בֶּן־ ben-
of Manasseh, "causing to forget," a son of Joseph, also a tribe desc. from him, also a king of Judah , also two Isr. H4519 מְנַשֶּׁ֜ה me·na·sheh
Analysis:
Read more about: Manasseh, Manasseh
which who, which, that H834 אֲשֶׁ֣ר a·sher
are in Gilead a region in Pal., also the name of several Isr. H1568 גִּלְעָ֑ד gil·'ad;
Analysis:
Read more about: Gilead
were his: the region cord, territory, band H2256 חֶ֤בֶל che·vel
of Argob, "heap," a district of Bashan, also an Isr. H709 אַרְגֹּב֙ ar·gov
Analysis:
Read more about: Argob, Argob, Argob
which who, which, that H834 אֲשֶׁ֣ר a·sher
is in Bashan, "smooth," a region E. of the Jordan H1316 בַּבָּשָׁ֔ן bab·ba·shan,
Analysis:
Read more about: Bashan
sixty sixty H8346 שִׁשִּׁים֙ shi·shim
Analysis:

Six: Grace

SIX: The number “six” relates to the Grace of God. It is not a coincidence that man was created on the sixth day of the week. The fact that man became a living being on the sixth day reveals that only by means of the grace of God will man experience true life, i.e. eternal life, through a relationship with God. In the book of Isaiah, there is a passage which is rich in theological truth. In chapter six, one reads about the death of King Uzziah. It is this statement about Uzziah’s death that sets the context for this passage. Next, the reader is given a vision of heaven with the Lord sitting on His throne. It is said about God that He is; “high and lifted up.” The sages understand that the purpose of this phrase “high and lifted up” is to convey to the reader that there is a large separation between man and God. There is also mentioned in this vision of heaven that there were seraphim (a type of angel) present around the throne. It is revealed to the reader that each of the seraphim had six wings. The seraphim would call to one another saying:

"Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord of Hosts, full is the entire earth of His glory." 
Isaiah 6:3

Because of this proclamation concerning the Holiness of God, the heavens shook and were filled with smoke. To this, the man Isaiah stated:

"Woe is me, for I am undone, for a man of unclean lips am I and in the midst of a people with unclean lips I dwell; for the King— the Lord of Hosts, my eyes have seen." Isaiah 6:5

Isaiah is responding to the fact that he has just heard that the whole world is going to be full of the glory of God. It was this vision of a Holy God, Who was high and lifted up, that revealed to him his own sinfulness and the sinfulness of his people. His statement in verse five shows his hopelessness in and of himself. However, the next occurrence in this vision focuses upon the seraphim, which had six wings. One of the seraphim flew to the altar and removed a burning ember and then touched the lips of Isaiah with it. Because of this act, the reader is informed that the iniquity of Isaiah is removed and his sin has been atoned. The point is that there is a direct connection to the six-winged seraph (seraphim in the plural) and the removal of iniquity and the atoning of sin. Theologically, one knows that the removal of iniquity and the atoning of sin are only the result of the grace of God. 

Another reason that the number six is related to the grace of God is seen in the fact that there were six cities of refuge. A city of refuge was a type of 
safe-haven for one who had killed an individual without direct intent of doing so. It was not seen as an accident; rather the Torah calls the killer a murderer. A family member of the one killed was commanded to slay the murderer; however, the murderer could flee to one of the six cities of refuge and be safe within the walls of this city. In other words, although the murderer should die as the consequence of his action, he finds "grace" in the city of refuge. It is not a coincidence that there are six cities of refuge. 

In the book of Ruth, the concept of redemption is a major theme. When Boaz agrees to act as the kinsman redeemer to Ruth, the reader is told that he gives her six measures of barley (Ruth 3:15). This again is not a chance happening. It is to reveal to the reader the relationship between grace (that which the number six expresses) and redemption. When speaking about the Exodus from Egypt, which also came about through redemption (the Passover sacrifice), one finds that 600,000 men from the Hebrews came out of Egypt, i.e. experienced redemption (see Exodus 12:37). Once again the number six appears (600,000) to emphasize the connection between grace and redemption.

In the New Testament, there are several places where the number six appears and once again the context is grace. In John's Gospel, the writer begins to speak about Passover. It has already been stated that Passover is known as the Festival of Redemption. To remind the reader of the connection between redemption and grace, John writes:

"Therefore Yeshua, six days before the Passover, came to Bethany…." 
John 12:1

Another interesting occurrence of the number six is also found in John's Gospel. Here the context is also Passover. In this section, Yeshua speaks about the destruction of the Temple, which took forty and six years to build. He states that He will raise it up in three days (Here Yeshua is referring to His body). How do these numbers assist the reader to arrive at a proper interpretation of the passage? Although we have yet to study the significance of the number forty, we will learn that forty relates to a transition or change. John chapter two alludes clearly to the destruction of the Temple. Why will the Temple be destroyed? The answer is multifaceted. First, the message which the Temple service was supposed to convey to the people, was so distorted by the corruption that characterized the Temple in Yeshua's day. Second, the time was at hand for the grace of God to be revealed. It is important for the reader to remember that when Yeshua alluded to the Temple, He mentioned the forty and six years that it took for it to be built. Why was this fact necessary to be included in this passage? It is a hermeneutical aid to the reader. Forty and six speaks about a change or transition (the significance of the number forty) to grace (the meaning of the number six) and away from the sacrificial system of the Temple. The number three also appears in this discourse (see John 2:19). As we have already learned, the number three expresses a revealing or documentation.  Hence, Yeshua was revealing (3) this change (40) from the sacrifices at the Temple, to the grace (6) of God, that His resurrection would document (3).

The final example, which we will examine from the New Testament is in Matthew's Gospel. In Matthew chapter 27, the context is once again Passover. In the passage in question, one reads,

"And from the sixth hour darkness was upon all the earth until the ninth hour." Matthew 27:45

Matthew's Gospel was written in a way those from a Jewish background could easily grasp the significance of what he was stating. Jewish sages of old pointed out that because the Exodus from Egypt took place in the night, there was a connection between darkness (the night) and redemption (the Exodus from Egypt). To convey to Israel that this One Who hung upon the Cross was in fact the Redeemer, HaShem caused a miracle to take place. As the verse states, there was darkness upon all the earth until the ninth hour. Although we have yet to study the significance of the number nine, let it suffice to say now that the number nine relates to "outcome" or "deed". Hence, the sixth hour is mentioned to relate to the grace of God and the ninth hour is recorded to reveal what was the outcome of the death of Yeshua, i.e. Redemption. 

Loveisrael.org - Baruch Korman, Ph.D. - All Rights Reserved - Used with Permission 2016

great great H1419 גְּדֹלֹ֔ות ge·do·lo·vt,
cities city, town H5892 עָרִ֣ים a·rim
with walls a wall H2346 חֹומָ֖ה cho·v·mah
and bronze copper, bronze H5178 נְחֹֽשֶׁת׃ ne·cho·shet.
bars a bar H1280 וּבְרִ֥יחַ u·ve·ri·ach
[were] his);      

Locations

Argob

ARGOB (1)ar'-gob ('argobh, "story"): A locality or a person mentioned in the obscure passage 2 Kings 15:25. The context deals with Pekah's conspiracy against Pekahiah; but it is not clear, owing to the state of the text, whether Argob and his associate Arieh (if these are the names of men) were officers of Pekahiah who were slain with him, or fellow-conspira... View Details

Bashan

BASHANba'-shan (ha-bashan, "the Bashan"; Basan): This name is probably the same in meaning as the cognate Arabic bathneh, "soft, fertile land," or bathaniyeh (batanaea), "this land sown with wheat" ("wheatland").1. Boundaries:It often occurs with the article, "the Bashan," to describe the kingdom of Og, the most northerly part of the land East of the Jordan.... View Details

Gilead

GILEAD (1)gil'-e-ad (ha-gil`adh, "the Gilead"): The name is explained in Genesis 31:46, 51, as derived from Hebrew gal, "a cairn," and `edh, "witness," agreeing in meaning with the Aramaic yegharsahadhutha'. The Arabic jilead means "rough," "rugged."(1) A city named in Hosea 6:8; Hosea 12:11, possibly to be identified with Gilead near to Mizpah (Judges 10:17... View Details

Jair (Gilead)

JAIRja'-er:(1) Jair (ya'ir, "he enlightens" or "one giving light"):(a) Son, i.e. descendant of Manasseh (Numbers 32:41 Deuteronomy 3:14 Joshua 13:30 1 Kings 4:13 1 Chronicles 2:22 f). According to 1 Chronicles 2:21 he was the son of ScRub, son of Hezron, a descendant of Judah, who married the daughter of Machir, son of Manasseh. He was thus descended both fr... View Details

People

Argob

Argob

Argob

|heap,| a district of Bashan, also an Israelite

Ben

a Levite

Ben-geber

|son of a man,| one of Solomon's leaders

Geber

an Israelite name

Jair

Jair [N] [H] [S] enlightener.  The son of Segub. He was brought up with his mother in Gilead, where he had possessions ( 1 Chronicles 2:22 ). He distinguished himself in an expedition against Bashan, and settled in the part of Argob on the borders of Gilead. The small towns taken by him there are called Havoth-jair, i.e., "Jair's villages" ( Numbers 32:41 ;  Deuteronomy 3:14 ... View Details

Manasseh

Manasseh [N] [H] [S] who makes to forget. "God hath made me forget" (Heb. nashshani),  Genesis 41:51 .  The elder of the two sons of Joseph. He and his brother Ephraim were afterwards adopted by Jacob as his own sons ( 48:1 ). There is an account of his marriage to a Syrian ( 1 Chronicles 7:14 ); and the only thing afterwards recorded of him is, that his grandchildren were "... View Details

Manasseh

Manasseh [N] [H] [S] who makes to forget. "God hath made me forget" (Heb. nashshani),  Genesis 41:51 .  The elder of the two sons of Joseph. He and his brother Ephraim were afterwards adopted by Jacob as his own sons ( 48:1 ). There is an account of his marriage to a Syrian ( 1 Chronicles 7:14 ); and the only thing afterwards recorded of him is, that his grandchildren were "... View Details

Parallel Verses

Removed text
Added text
New American Standard Bible Ben-geber, in Ramoth-gilead (the towns of Jair, the son of Manasseh, which are in Gilead were his: the region of Argob, which is in Bashan, sixty great cities with walls and bronze bars were his);
King James Bible Ben-geber, The son of Geber, in Ramoth-gilead (the Ramothgilead; to him pertained the towns of Jair, Jair the son of Manasseh, which are in Gilead were his: Gilead; to him also pertained the region of Argob, which is in Bashan, sixty threescore great cities with walls and bronze bars were his);brasen bars:
Hebrew Greek English Ben-geber, in Ramoth-gilead (the towns of Jair, the son of Manasseh, which are in Gilead were his: the region of Argob, which is in Bashan, sixty great cities with walls and bronze bars were his);